Viral takeover: how viruses take advantage of infected cells

It’s that time of year when everyone seems to be catching some kind of virus. While you might be familiar with a virus’s potential to make you feel miserable, have you ever wondered how viruses work to cause illness? A virus is much like a robber in a factory. A viral “robber” has both a strategy to get into the factory and the ability to use the machines to make what it wants. Similarly, when a virus gets access to the cells of your body it is able to hijack the machinery that your cell would normally use to replicate its genetic material and make its own proteins. The virus can use your cells to make more copies of itself and spread from cell to cell. How does your cell get tricked into making more virus? One lab at K-State has found a way that one sneaky virus accomplishes this. The culprit: vaccinia virus. Continue reading “Viral takeover: how viruses take advantage of infected cells”

Extremely Adapted!

From minuscule bacteria to roaming elephants, life has taken hold of our planet. Through the process of evolution by natural selection, life on earth has taken various forms and utilizes all kinds of spaces. Even the most extreme environments such as our frozen poles, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, dry deserts, and poisonous waters, are inhabited by life. How animals evolve to survive and thrive in these environments is a curiosity that evolutionary biologists like Ryan Greenway at Kansas State University seek to understand. He and colleagues ask big questions, such as how do organisms adapt to different environments and how can that adaptation lead to new species forming in nature? Continue reading “Extremely Adapted!”

Yeast, genes, and green-glowing machines

In case you didn’t know, there is a lab making glowing green baker’s yeast at K-State. Are these mad scientists trying to create neon green baked goods that will be a smash hit at parties? While some people may be sad to hear that’s not the case, these glowing green yeast are actually being used to investigate questions that might lead to treatments for cancer and other diseases. Continue reading “Yeast, genes, and green-glowing machines”

Dig heavy metal? So do these plants

When you hear “environmental disaster,” images from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Chernobyl, the Dust Bowl, or the Exxon Valdez oil spill may come to mind. As you picture oil slicks, chemical burns, and polluted waters, it is difficult to imagine life after these devastating events. Do plants and animals actually survive in these rapidly changing and degrading habitats? If so, how do they do it?

Continue reading “Dig heavy metal? So do these plants”

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