Drought and draughts: Hopper discusses stream fish responses to climate change

Fish, believe it or not, need water. Though this may not be a shocking revelation, it does make predicting what might happen to fish when the waters they depend on disappear rather simple. Imagine being confined to a small, swelteringly hot room with a limited amount of oxygen to breathe that nearly disappears overnight. You cannot escape, and you realize that you are ill-equipped to survive very long under such conditions. That scenario does not sound very pleasant, does it? In the years ahead, scientists expect climate change to increase both the length and number of drought events here in the Kansas Flint Hills. But how will aquatic organisms like fish fare under these drier future climatic conditions? As the sweltering summer heat and the historic drought that accompanied it lingered on, this question spurred researchers at K-State to investigate. Continue reading “Drought and draughts: Hopper discusses stream fish responses to climate change”

Dams, diets, and endangered fish

Freshwater is necessary for human society in many ways, especially as a water supply for farming, industry, cities and towns. The most common way people have found to make water readily available is by building dams, which stop free-flowing streams and rivers to create reservoirs of standing water. While dams have been important for human population growth and major technological innovations, dams often negatively affect many of the animals and plants that inhabit rivers. Continue reading “Dams, diets, and endangered fish”

Thirsty Plants: How African grasses shield themselves from drought

Africa is famous for its wide-open spaces that are home to charismatic wildlife, such as giraffes, elephants, and rhinos. For ecologists, these wide-open spaces are an opportunity to study systems that have limited industrial human impact compared to the areas many of us live and work in. Many ecologists are interested in how large animals influence the landscape as well as how organisms survive in harsh environments. For me and 8 other ecologists from Kansas State University and Oklahoma State University, the opportunity to study how grasses survive drought inspired our recent trip to Botswana. Continue reading “Thirsty Plants: How African grasses shield themselves from drought”

Dancing in the rain: the nitty gritty of field work in the rainforest

As a kid, I loved playing outside. Since I’ve grown up (or at least gotten older), one would think that opportunities to splash in mud puddles and roll down hills might have diminished. On the contrary, I have carefully selected my career to maximize the time I spend out of doors, rain or shine. I study White-ruffed Manakins (Corapipo altera), an adorable bird that lives in the tropical forests of Central America (learn more about these birds from the recent post on Dr. Alice Boyle’s Science on Tap). To study the effect rain has on the breeding behavior and social hierarchies of male manakins, I spend four months of the year in gorgeous Parque Nacional Volcán Tenorio in northern Costa Rica. I spend my days catching manakins, finding the areas where males perform elaborate courtship displays for females, and observing their displays and interactions. This is what I tell people when they ask what I do all day in the forest, but it really feels like I’m just playing outside and if I were to elaborate a bit on each of those activities, the real story of what happens in the field starts to emerge… Continue reading “Dancing in the rain: the nitty gritty of field work in the rainforest”

Greedy Plants: Water use and nighttime transpiration in the tallgrass prairie

This post is a highlight of a research article recently published by K-State alum Dr. Kimberly O’Keefe and her PhD advisor, Dr. Jesse Nippert.

On the Biology Division office front desk sits a small bowl of candy. Students often grab one or two pieces on their way in and out of the office, as expected, but you would not necessarily expect a student to take the whole bowl. Likewise, you would not expect other organisms to use more resources than they need, not necessarily because they have manners, but because it is not efficient to gather more resources than necessary. Yet recent evidence suggests that in some grasslands, certain plants may be doing just that—absorbing more than they need to cripple their neighbors’ success. These greedy plants are not hoarding candy, but water, which is essential to life. Continue reading “Greedy Plants: Water use and nighttime transpiration in the tallgrass prairie”

Different stories, same conclusion: how evolution is sometimes like a “choose your own adventure” book

When I was growing up, I really enjoyed “choose your own adventure” books. The adventures in these books would start out with the same problem and allow you to make decisions that would affect the story’s outcome from there. For instance, you might start out at the entrance to a cave and have to decide whether to go in or walk in the opposite direction. Typically, these different decisions would lead to different outcomes, although occasionally two or more stories would converge on the same ending. Continue reading “Different stories, same conclusion: how evolution is sometimes like a “choose your own adventure” book”

Science on Tap: Rain, migration, and dancing birds

When is too much rain a bad thing? In eastern Kansas, we know that rain drives the productivity of crops and other plants, but we also understand that raging floodwaters can cause major damage. However, some ecosystems rely on enormous amounts of rain. In tropical rainforests, life thrives while receiving as much as seven times the average rainfall in Manhattan, Kansas. So can these tropical wet rainforests get too much rain? Continue reading “Science on Tap: Rain, migration, and dancing birds”

Relationships on the reef: Valentine’s Day tips from a fishy source

For some, today might be an annoying reminder of your relationship status that you wish would just be over already. On the other hand, maybe your mind is filled with thoughts of the lasting bond shared between partners. Either way, Valentine’s Day is upon us, and it seems impossible to ignore. While scrolling Twitter and Facebook you might even see posts and articles like these: Headlines

Every year it seems like there is some version of these articles circulating around. Here at Science Snapshots, rather than making our own “animal relationships” list, we decided to dive into a recent study of fish that create long-lasting partnerships to demonstrate how scientists approach interesting animal relationships and investigate why they occur. Continue reading “Relationships on the reef: Valentine’s Day tips from a fishy source”

Viral takeover: how viruses take advantage of infected cells

It’s that time of year when everyone seems to be catching some kind of virus. While you might be familiar with a virus’s potential to make you feel miserable, have you ever wondered how viruses work to cause illness? A virus is much like a robber in a factory. A viral “robber” has both a strategy to get into the factory and the ability to use the machines to make what it wants. Similarly, when a virus gets access to the cells of your body it is able to hijack the machinery that your cell would normally use to replicate its genetic material and make its own proteins. The virus can use your cells to make more copies of itself and spread from cell to cell. How does your cell get tricked into making more virus? One lab at K-State has found a way that one sneaky virus accomplishes this. The culprit: vaccinia virus. Continue reading “Viral takeover: how viruses take advantage of infected cells”

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑